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Help! Want to change the name from Tit to Bee, what do you think?

A project log for Tit

A supercharged Arduino pro-mini compatible board with Atmega328pb

Sandeep PatilSandeep Patil 05/19/2016 at 03:4319 Comments

I am found of naming boards after birds. Tit was named after the bird Willow Tit. Since I am not a native English speaker was not aware of the other meaning of the word Tit/Tits. Speaking to a friend, I realized what it means. I had done a google image search for the name, when finalizing it. Nothing else except the bird had popped up in the search results, because the search filters were on! Apologies for it.

I think I will rename it to Bee (after hummingbird bee); will have to change all the references in code, pages and even the name on the board. We have 100 PCBs made for it. Will putting a sticker help? What do you think about the whole thing?

Discussions

qquuiinn wrote 08/16/2016 at 07:47 point

What about 'Pip' ? 

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davedarko wrote 05/19/2016 at 17:44 point

I think the fubarino guys will get way more angry/confused comments about the name than you will :)

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Stuart Longland wrote 05/19/2016 at 17:37 point

I can think of worse names for something:
The name "tit" is memorable, short, and it'll make peoples' ears prick up when they first hear it for sure, but as you came by the name quite innocently, I don't think there's any issue -- say compared to the problem people at the above restaurant would have answering the phones…

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greenaum wrote 05/19/2016 at 14:18 point

"Tit" isn't offensive, it's very mild swearing. Your mother might slap you for saying it if you're 10 years old. People are more likely to find it funny. If there's a picture of the bird somewhere on the packaging or board, or you use it as a logo, that'll make it clear that you're not obsessed with mammaries. 

I'm a native English speaker from England, where we have the best English! Up to you whether you want to change it. It'll just get a few small laughs, that's all. And it's certainly memorable! Maybe that's a good thing. 

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Sandeep Patil wrote 05/19/2016 at 17:21 point

That explains how one might feel listening the name for the first time and it sounds good. 

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Craig Hissett wrote 05/19/2016 at 13:59 point

Just leave it as tit - don't let us English and our crude slang be a reason not to use a perfectly good word :-)

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Sandeep Patil wrote 05/19/2016 at 17:19 point

Thanks that is relieving :-) 

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de∫hipu wrote 05/19/2016 at 13:22 point

You could always call it after https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booby (now I'm trolling).

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Sandeep Patil wrote 05/19/2016 at 13:18 point

Thanks @Radomir and @davedarko. From your suggestion, I am now inclined towards keeping the same name.  Let me give it a couple of days and see.

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de∫hipu wrote 05/19/2016 at 11:02 point

Have you considered renaming it to "titmouse", which has no ambiguity, and leaving the code references as they are, for brevity? I mean, with "titmouse" nobody would have any stupid ideas about the other meaning of "tit".

If that doesn't work, there is also "chickadee"...

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davedarko wrote 05/19/2016 at 11:12 point

well you would make some Germans giggle with "Tittenmaus", are you sure you're not trolling right now? :)

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de∫hipu wrote 05/19/2016 at 11:19 point

I'm not, but then again I'm not a native speaker of either German or English. The bird is called "sikorka" in Polish, and has no connections whatsoever to anything sexual or dirty.

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davedarko wrote 05/19/2016 at 11:22 point

well sikorka sounds nice :) 

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de∫hipu wrote 05/19/2016 at 11:33 point

While commonly referred to as "tits" throughout much of the English-speaking world, these birds are called either "chickadees" (onomatopoeic, derived from their distinctive "chick-a dee dee dee" alarm call)[1] or "titmice" in North America. The name titmouse is recorded from the 14th century, composed of the Old English name for the bird, mase (Proto-Germanic *maison, German Meise), and tit, denoting something small. The spelling (formerly titmose) was influenced by mouse in the 16th century.[2] Emigrants to New Zealand presumably identified some of the superficially similar birds of the genus Petroica of the family Petroicidae, the Australian robins, as members of the tit family, giving them the title tomtit, although, in fact, they are not related.

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Sandeep Patil wrote 05/19/2016 at 13:12 point

Titmouse sounds good, but a bit lengthy I guess.

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davedarko wrote 05/19/2016 at 10:52 point

I think bee is too close to zigbee. Is sparrow taken yet? otherwise just let it be a tit, Radomir is right.

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Sandeep Patil wrote 05/19/2016 at 13:14 point

Yes, I am thinking of the same. May be a line everywhere to say Tit is inspired by the bird!

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de∫hipu wrote 05/19/2016 at 10:16 point

I think that you don't have to panic and fall into the extreme political correctness. The word "tit" means the bird, and the other meaning is basically a slang term, mis-spelling of "teat".

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esot.eric wrote 05/19/2016 at 10:34 point

LOL, over here it's not as much slang, but dang-near ubiquitous... From this side of the pond. Never heard "the bird" as a definition. OTOH, you could consider it more like "tit for tat" or whatnot... But that's Much Less Common.

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