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Cultivate a [safe!] bacteria that accumulates PHA, then recover the PHA granules, purify, and use for 3d-print filament!

Neil K. SheridanNeil K. Sheridan 03/31/2019 at 21:350 Comments

1. Obtain 1kg of Polyhydroxyalkaonate granules is ~£215 from sigma aldrich , then test if these can be made into 3d-printing filament using e.g. an extruder like the filabot.

2. If ok with making filament, then try some 3d prints! e.g. just a water holder for drinking!

CHECKPOINT PASSED! [yes/no]

3. Obtain Cupriavidus necator culture (e.g. 185,- €) and experiment with the growth and PHA accumulation phases using protocols from papers mentioned earlier. You will need to invest in various analytic tools!

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Q. What should Ralstonia eutropha be fed with?

Q. Is wild-type of an engineered type best?

Q. Which PHA is the best for 3d-printing? Depending on what we are printing of course!

A. [1] describes PHAs as 

PropertiesExtrusion TempProsCons
Several copolymers,
brittle and stiff
~160CUV-stable, stiffnessElasticity, brittle

So I'm not sure, since there are such a wide variety in the family! 

Two of the common members of the PHA family I have encountered so far:

- Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) aka P(3HB)

- P(3HB-co-3HHx)

References:

1. Pakkanen, J., Manfredi, D., Minetola, P., & Iuliano, L. (2017). About the Use of Recycled or Biodegradable Filaments for Sustainability of 3D Printing. Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies, 776–785.doi:10.1007/978-3-319-57078-5_73

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