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PhDouble-Sided pcb

Perfect Homemade Double-sided pcb

to2to2
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Far from perfect pcb guide but I would love to see your comments and hear about your methods.  

Collecting the best tricks to make my first double layer pcb or my first pcb ever at home.

This is a prototype for a device I was building for a researcher working on a camera sensor testing and calibration method using an led array of a very specific wavelengths to test camera sensors.

This guide is only about how I make double sided pcb but if you are interested to know what I was building in this guide, the project is based on this paper: link.

I have always wanted to learn how to make pcbs but never had the time for it and because of the Covid-19 I was unlucky enough to lose my job and have all the free time and I decided I should make pcbs.

There was many ways I found online for making double layer pcb and I tried most of them and I decided I should make the guide I needed to make double or single layer pcbs without much of the frustrations.

Far from perfect pcb guide but I would love to see your comments and hear about your methods.  

  • 1 × Double sided copper clad Or single sided depending on the project
  • 1 × ferric chloride
  • 1 × Source of light
  • 1 × Acetone
  • 1 × Alcohol

View all 16 components

  • 1
    Rub the copper clad with the steel wool very good

    Rub the copper clad with the steel wool very good to help the toner ink stick to it.

  • 2
    Clean the copper clad from the dust, grease and oils

    Clean the copper clad from the dust, grease and fats from your hands using acetone or alcohol and try not to touch it after you clean it.

  • 3
    Print the traces on a blank paper then use it to align the packaging tape on another blank paper.



    Print the traces on a piece of paper using your favorite CAD program.
    Then use it to align the packaging tape on another blank paper.
    This is step is important and should be perfect.

View all 18 instructions

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Discussions

Winston wrote a day ago point

You say this method is based upon the paper you linked to entitled: 

Led-based spectrally tunable light source for camera characterization

?????

Also, I was wondering how one could shine light through duct tape until I saw that you are apparently using transparent packing tape.

Finally, what is the purpose of the tape?

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to2 wrote a day ago point

I am building the device mentioned in the paper using methods I found on the internet. This guide is about how to make a double sided pcb only.

Sorry for using the wrong word, my English language is not perfect neither this guide. Thank you for the heads up, I will update it with (transparent packaging tape).

The tape is a replacement for the traditional toner transfer glossy paper.

The packaging tape works better for me.

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Winston wrote 11 hours ago point

"Sorry for using the wrong word, my English language is not perfect"

No need to apologize. The only language I know, besides VERY little Spanish, is English, so I greatly appreciate your use of English.

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Ken Yap wrote 2 days ago point

* duct tape

Been decades since I made double sided PCBs with the resist method. Ferric chloride was nasty, ammonium persulphate is less so. Drilling was and still is a pain, though less if of it if SMT is used.

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to2 wrote 2 days ago point

Thanks for the heads up. Totally perfect guide :D

I am planing to test other nasty chemicals in the future because I also hate the smell the Ferric Chloride leaves in the room/

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Ken Yap wrote a day ago point

I should mention that at the time I was a trainee in a small electronics company and we used to draw out the pattern on drafting paper double size (we had preprinted pads for DIP devices that we could stick on), get a photo shop to take a reduced picture of the drawings, then align the negatives and staple them together. No laser printers then, let alone computers running EDA programs.

The PCBs came without resist and we applied resist to them in a darkened room (sensitive to UV so a little light not dangerous). For exposure we clamped the sandwich between perspex plates and exposed it to the sun (this was in the tropics).

Warming the ferric chloride solution made etching faster but if it was too hot it would also start to attack the resist.

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