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Anteneh’s Jerry Can

A new kind of Jerry can for water transport for rural areas that ease the pain for the person carrying the load with lower cost.

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This project is about building a new kind of Jerry can for water transport for rural areas that ease the pain for the person carrying the load with lower cost.

Video


Problem 

Do you know that people in many part of the world travel many kilometers carrying water jerry can every day or few times a day to bring water for drinking, cooking, watering their plants and for many other reasons? If you are not aware, well you are about to. 

Water scarcity, which is broadly understood as the lack of access to adequate quantities of water for human and environmental uses, is considered to be one of the most important global risks for society. Global water demands are expected to increase in the future because of increasing populations, urbanization, and industrialization. In addition, aspects of climate change and anticipated increases in extreme weather events are expected to contribute to increases in the frequency, severity, and duration of droughts, which can exacerbate water availability problems. In an area where there is lack of water supply at home, people travel very far to fetch water. In almost all society this task falls under the women. It is very common to see women carrying 25 liter Jerry Can on their back or on their head and travel many kilometers from the source like river, lake or well to their homes. Describing how challenging it is can only be achieved if you try it yourself but to give you an idea on the challenge, 

The first problem is the concentrated weight of the 25 litter jerry can which will force you to use only one or two part of your body for support which requires enormous amount of force to overcome the high pressure. 

The second problem is the distance they have to travel in a very rough terrain full of mountains, muddy ground during rain, hole and sloppy ground, which is impossible even for a wheel aid transport. 

Solution

 The basic scientific concept for the development of this product is based on the fact that distributed force generates less pressure or impact than concentrated force. Instead of the standard shape of the 25 litter Jerry Can, Anteneh’s Jerry Can has torus shape with the same volume as the standard jerry can. For prototyping simplicity, the shape of torus is made square with center to center length of 66cm with pipe diameter of 11cm. At two opposite side of the pipes there are two attached lathers that are used to hold the Anetenh’s Jerry can on your shoulder. This will reduce the pressure of the water by distributing the weight of the water and utilize all part of our body for support. To maintain the load close to center of gravity which is the person carrying it, the diameter of the pipe can be varied and the length of the pipe will be varied depending up on the amount variation of the diameter based on the size model of the user. Which means for thin peoples the diameter is increased and length will be decreased and for plus size people the diameter is decreased and the length will be increased. Both lathers are attached to each other with a lather for hand grab incase two peoples want to transport one Anteneh’s Jerry Can. 

Market

 According to reports some 2.2 billion people around the world do not have safely managed  drinking water services, 1.1 billion people lack access to water and 2.7 billion experience water scarcity at least one month a year. By 2025, two-thirds of the world’s population may be facing water shortages and countries with the highest percentage of the population lacking basic access to water are in great risk like Eritrea (80.7% lack basic water services), Papua New Guinea (63.4% lack basic water services), Uganda (61.1% lack basic water services), Ethiopia (60.9% lack basic water services), Somalia (60% lack basic water services), Angola (59% lack basic water services), Democratic Republic of the Congo (58.2% lack basic water services), Chad (57.5% lack basic water services), Niger (54.2% lack basic water services), Mozambique (52.7% lack basic water services) and so on. Therefore it is inevitable that people living in these zones will...

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  • 1 × PVC pipe (110 millimeters in diameter and 2 meter in length) = 90.00 ETB
  • 4 × PVC 90 degree elbow (110 millimeters in diameter) = 120.00 ETB
  • 1 × PVC T connection (110 millimeters in diameter) = 50.00 ETB
  • 1 × PVC tap (110 millimeters in diameter) = 35 ETB

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Anteneh Gashaw wrote 04/05/2021 at 08:39 point

My projects are submitted to the impact africa... Looking forward for the evaluation report.

https://www.impactafricasummit.net/ 

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R.C. Moore wrote 04/04/2021 at 19:01 point

>This will prove my claims undeniably with numbers. 

I am Humbled, Sir.  I used 462 words to offer my critique of your project.  

You only required 8 to point out the real problem.  H.L. Mencken himself would be impressed, as am I.

I can only suggest you put on some worn out clothes, sleep on the ground overnight, skip breakfast, put on the sorriest pair of worn out sandals you can find, hike out 10k over the roughest ground available to a stream bed,  fill by hand with a small can or bottle a non-leaking prototype with actual water, and hike back.  This will go somewhat to emulate the 3rd world/nomadic/refugee experience. You won't need numbers to prove anything to yourself or anyone else after a few trips like this.  By the way, make sure your prototype holds as much as a jerry can, 20 litres.  Again I will remind you I am someone who actually has done this sort of thing every few days for a two years, except my terrain was as likely to be below 0c as above and was woodland rather than desert.  And I assure you I would not have wanted to do it with your project, well-intentioned as it might be.  I leave you to your experimentation, for which I strongly suggest you utilize your muscles rather than your arithmetic. They will school you.

Thank you

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Anteneh Gashaw wrote 04/04/2021 at 09:50 point

Please see the project details for the numerical and structural analysis of the product. 

This will prove my claims undeniably with numbers. 

Thank you. 

  Are you sure? yes | no

amd_athlonxp wrote 04/02/2021 at 11:22 point

This grey pipes are normally made from Polyethylene. (PE-pipes)

If he can reduce the cost (moulding) and increase the stability (testing in the real world necessary), then he could possible help the people.

But it is possible that the people (woman) can not move so good with this ring around their body.  The possibility that this project will fail, is still high in my opinion.

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Anteneh Gashaw wrote 04/04/2021 at 10:45 point

@amd_athlonxp  see the project details for the numerical and structural analysis of the product. 

This will prove my claims undeniably with numbers. 

Thank you.

  Are you sure? yes | no

R.C. Moore wrote 04/01/2021 at 15:58 point

I have lived in areas that required a long manual carry of all my water needs, luckily in slightly kinder terrain than what is shown in the video.  Your project is as others have noted, a very serious knee, leg or back injury waiting to happen.  It blocks the users field of sight, it is difficult to safely shuck or redirect the load when a fall begins, and every time this poorly secured load shifts it will magnify an already serious strain on the person carrying.  For the people you're hoping to market your project to any injury that keeps them from carrying water is a calamity persons living in more developed areas often find hard to understand.  Your design is also difficult to thoroughly clean and impossible to visually inspect, and I can't imagine how aggravating the ridiculous thing would be to fill in difficult or cramped conditions. If you don't accept even the experience of tens of thousands of years of human load-carrying and scoff that it is promotion masquerading as science, you should direct your talents to some less critical endeavor than carrying potable water.  Every person shown in your video appears to be so poor they can only afford a container and a bit of rope or a bolt of cloth to secure their load.  What every one of them needs is a pack basket with straps and hopefully a hip belt, or better yet a frame pack with hip belt.  If one has either pack it is useful for much more than just carrying water, including especially firewood and food.  

Pack baskets have been around since long before you or I were born.  Here's how one can be made with hand tools.  This particular design has no hip belt to shift the load directly  to the hips, but it is still a great improvement over what the poorest of the poor are forced to use.  Note the straps that secure the basket - these straps alone redesigned to easily adjust to carrying a jerry can or similar container would make many of these people extremely happy even without the basket.  https://www.instructables.com/Pack-Basket/

Here's a shortened link to a Google Search page full of vintage wooden pack frame designs.  In a pinch you could tie a water load to almost any of them.  Since the people in the area you show in your video don't appear to have much access to wood, metal, water or money you should agree there is ample opportunity to apply your intellect to a practical solution.  One that hopefully doesn't involve large involve large convoluted pipes, heavy loads loosely secured by long straps, obstruction of vision in dangerous terrain and a design that appears to have come from a Dr. Seuss childrens book.  https://tinyurl.com/2ws7a4sb

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Anteneh Gashaw wrote 04/04/2021 at 10:46 point

@R.C. Moore  

 see the project details for the numerical and structural analysis of the product. 

This will prove my claims undeniably with numbers. 

  Are you sure? yes | no

s.jones wrote 04/01/2021 at 09:30 point

This has to be an April Fool joke. 

If it isn't, then please do not waste any more time on this ridiculous contraption. You will cause injuries with this. The weight is not "distributed around the wearer's torso" (as if that were a good thing - why?) the weight is all (and only!) on the shoulders, only now it swings around and inhibits the user's arms and blocks the users vision for foot placement in rough terrain. Totally impractical and worse than previous solutions that have been around for thousands of years. 

It's good to try to re-think a problem, and I applaud your spirit of inventor, but knowing when to scrap a bad concept is crucial.  

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Anteneh Gashaw wrote 04/04/2021 at 10:46 point

@s.jones  

 see the project details for the numerical and structural analysis of the product. 

This will prove my claims undeniably with numbers. 

  Are you sure? yes | no

programmin1 wrote 03/31/2021 at 19:23 point

Doesn't most PVC contain lead? Other than that seems like a neat invention and something you could probably market to backpackers.

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Anteneh Gashaw wrote 04/01/2021 at 07:59 point

@programmin1  yes they do. The main reason for the use of PVC on the prototype is because they are easily available and good to work on. When transition to market I will use mold to generate the structure same as the production procedure of the standard jerry cans. 

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mtreddy wrote 03/31/2021 at 17:31 point

Great idea. It would be great if you could add a foldable stand, in case some one wants to take a break while carrying.  

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Anteneh Gashaw wrote 04/01/2021 at 06:53 point

@mtreddy  that is great idea and I have not thought it before. But this will increase the cost and our customers of the product have limited purchasing capacity. Efficiency, health and cost are the main point of the project.

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Nolan Hergert wrote 03/31/2021 at 17:02 point

Hey Anteneh, nice video!

While I agree that the weight is now evenly distributed (a big help!), I think you still have the problem of the weight being concentrated on the shoulders. Hips/legs are much better suited for carrying loads than our shoulders/spine. Maybe look into a hip belt like what backpacks have? https://blog.tortugabackpacks.com/backpack-hip-belt/


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Anteneh Gashaw wrote 04/01/2021 at 07:51 point

@Nolan Hergert  

 Very great feedback. I have not considered adding hip belt for minimizing the load pressure at the shoulder but I have thought of some kind of simple attachment between the side pipes and the hip to stabilize possible oscillation after field testing. 

I have read the article via your link and I liked it. According to the link hip attachment will reduce the load on the shoulder but on the article it says "A full-sized carry on backpack is too heavy to carry on just your shoulders. If you disagree, just detach the belt. All Tortuga hip belts are removable". Why they say if you disagree if it's a scientifically proven and tested fact. This makes you wonder if it is for just promotion. 

I will definitely consider it and I intend to do some test to add another strap on the hip for load sharing with the shoulder if it works.

Thank you.

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Nolan Hergert wrote 04/01/2021 at 23:38 point

Yep, keep playing around with it and talk with your target market. Maybe a cheap jug or two wrapped close to the body isn't so bad? They have probably thought of drilling a well and using a hand-operated pump before, so that option is out.

Lots of things can be proven and yet people still won't believe it :) Thankfully in this case it's easy to test out different options, which is what they are referring to.

Good luck!

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Anteneh Gashaw wrote 04/02/2021 at 06:23 point

Yes of course,  I will focus on the improvement. 

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Anteneh Gashaw wrote 04/04/2021 at 11:10 point

@Nolan Hergert  

see the project details for the numerical and structural analysis of the product. 

This will prove my claims undeniably with numbers. 

Thank you. 

  Are you sure? yes | no

Nolan Hergert wrote 04/06/2021 at 05:37 point

You are kind of showing my point! I can tell you from personal experience that carrying something with a waist strap feels 2-3X easier than with the weight on my shoulders, even though technically the weight is only on the back of my body. Even if I were to equally distribute the weight around my body (by wearing two backpacks), it still wouldn't matter that much compared to a waist strap. No amount of math will convince me otherwise, since I've experienced it myself. 

It looks like your derivations are only showing that the center of mass is in the center of the person. While this is a solvable number, it does not show why that is the most important factor in placing a load on a human. I would argue pack stability and placement on the hips is much more important, but I only have anecdotes.

Good luck! It's ultimately your project.

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