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AND!XOR DC26 Badge

The Wild West of IoT

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A hackable IoT conference badge, featuring a full color screen, blinky lights, games, puzzles, and easter eggs.

BADGE HARDWARE SPECS

  • We'll get there...

Note: Prototype displayed ...

BADGE FUNCTIONS

  • We'll get there...

WHO:: We are 5 dudes from California with backgrounds in HW and SW engineering. We enjoy building and hacking things for fun. AND!XOR pronounced..."AND-NOT-EX-OR"...

WHAT:: We built a hackable, open badge for use at DEFCON 26 in Las Vegas and any other conferences in the future. The badge also serves as a dev board for hardware developers of any experience level from novice to expert sorcerer.

WHY:: The purpose is to put some really awesome hardware around the necks of a bunch of hackers and see what they come up with. We hope to encourage others to make use of the badge and come back with their own flavor in years to come, AND to promote embedded development across the community.

HOW:: Pure internet science. We've developed algorithms which calculate the spin rate of cat quarks for generating our ssh keys at a rate of (P+9)/((# of blackberry users)^2), where P is the probability that a cat will leave a house when a door is opened for them.

WHERE:: Caesars Palace, Las Vegas

WHEN:: Aug 9th - Aug 12th, 2018

EXTRAS:: We are spending our free time and money outside of our busy work schedules to develop this from 3 separate locations across California. So we are definitely open and encourage feedback, suggestions, and features to be added onto the badge. If you complain that there are not enough blinky's happening then you are welcome to build your own. Feel free to Leave your comments below if you have questions, concerns, comments, philosophical statements, haiku's, or send us a tweet...that works too.

Twitter:: Check out AND!XOR, our official twitter account on twitter for daily and often hourly updates of the badge process.

  • 1 × ESP32 WROOVER MCU
  • 1 × ISSI IS31FL3736 LED Driver
  • 1 × MF-RES-0402-1M 1M Resistor
  • 1 × JS202011SCQN Switches and Relays / Switches
  • 1 × CP2102N USB to UART Bridge

View all 22 components

  • LULZCODE

    Hyr0n07/19/2018 at 16:15 0 comments

    Rather than repeat a lot of existing information, this serves as a pointer to our online documentation for LULZCODE hosted at geocities and youtube. You WILL need to know this in order to hack the badge ;) 

    Link: LULZCODE Technical Documentation

    Link: YouTube Demonstration - Flappy Bird (Pt 1/2)

    Link: YouTube Demonstration - Flappy Bird (Pt 2/2)

    (Sorry for two parts, interwebs kept dropping)

    LULZCODE IZ DESIGND 2 CONTROL NEARLY ALL ASPECTS OV TEH AN!XOR INDIE BADGE 4 DEF CON 26. 2 ACCOMPLISH DIS WE NEEDD 2 EXTEND LOLCODE 2 MEET R NEEDZ.

    HOW IZ LULZCODE DIFFERENT?
    NEARLY ALL LOLCODE 1.2 FEATUREZ HAS BEEN CARRID FWD. WE ESSENTIALLY DOUBLD TEH LANGUAGE SIZE 2 MEET R NEEDZ. WAN IMPORTANT FEACHUR DAT WUZ REMOVD WUZ UNICODE AS IT REQUIRD 2 MUTCH FLASH STORAGE. WE ALSO MAK USE OV BUKKITS WHICH R NOT FULLY SUPPORTD IN LOLCODE.

    WUT IZ LULZCODE 4?
    AFTR READIN OVAR TEH LOLCODE SPEC SEVERAL TIEMS AN FIGHTIN BAK TEH TEARS WE REALIZD IT LIKELY TURIN-COMPLETE. IT HAD EVRYTHIN WE NEEDD. EXCEPT IT DIDNT WERK WELL ON MICROCONTROLLR. IN FACT, IT ONLY HAD BASIC USR INPUT AN OUTPUT. 4 R BADGEZ WE NED LANGUAGE DAT LETS US CONTROL TEH LOW-LEVEL PERIFERALS. SO LULZCODE WUZ BORN. AN EXTENSHUN OV LOLCODE 2 SUPPORT MICROCONTROLLERS.

    LIMITASHUNS
    NOT EVRYTHIN WUZ EXPOSD IN LULZCODE. IT TURNS OUT MODIFYIN LANGUAGE IZ LOT OV WERK. RATHR WE TOOK MOAR PRAGMATIC APPROACH AN STARTD WRITIN R BADGE CODE IN LOLCODE DEN EXTENDIN TEH LANGUAGE WHEREVR WE NEEDD IT.

    LULZCODE MEMS USAGE IZ VRY HIGH. IN FACT AN AVERAGE LULZCODE SCRIPT CAN USE UP 2 100KB OV HEAP MEMS. THAZ 5 TIEMS WUT R FURST BADGE HAD 4 MEMS. 4 DIS REASON WE R RUNNIN TEH BADGE ON AN ESP32-WROVR WHICH GIVEZ US 4MB OV EXTERNAL SPI RAM.

    LULZCODE IZ SLOW. VRY SLOW. IZ INTERPRETTIN STRINGS SO LOAD TIEM TAKEZ AWHILE. ONCE TEH PARSE TREE IZ IN MEMS (C ABOOV) ITZ PERFORMANCE IZ K BUT NOT GREAT.

    LOLCODE 1.2 SPEC 4 MOAR ON LOLCODE C: HTTPS://GITHUB.COM/JUSTINMEZA/LOLCODE-SPEC/BLOB/MASTAH/V1.2/LOLCODE-SPEC-V1.2.MD

  • Yet another way to debounce a button

    Zapp05/24/2018 at 15:04 0 comments

    First things first. We did get a small sponsorship in the way of free parts and development kits from Dialog Semiconductor. This occurred after we had designed and prototyped with the Greenpak. This post is not sponsored in any way and our own thoughts / opinions.

    Trying something new

    If you've heard us speak at various conferences and meetings (Cyphercon, Hackaday Super Conference, Layer One, Macrofab, DC858/619), you undoubtedly heard us mention the desire to use an FPGA in our designs but could never justify it with use cases or functions the user cared about. Just because you can use hardware, doesn't mean you should. 

    These badge projects are concerted efforts by our team members to expand and learn new things. Now on our third major badge we have a third technique for debouncing. Enter the Greenpak.

    Calling it an FPGA is quite a stretch but the methodology is similar.

    Last summer I listened to The Amp Hour with Michael Ossman as a special guest. He mentioned wanting to play with Greenpaks and putting them into a development mode that was barely documented to do fun things with it. After some quick research I added it to our ideas list for DC26 and around October timeframe purchased a development kit. Soon after I was blinking LEDs.

    Creating a Debouncer

    To create the GreenPak logic, a specialized designer must be used. Fortunately the interface is all drag and drop. It takes a little getting used to coming from an EDA tool like Kicad, but isn't the worst. It would be nice to see improvements to how the line junctions are drawn and make them act like other tools, but oh well.

    After trying several examples and getting unusually excited by blinky lights, I finally got to work on my primary task, using the Greenpak to debounce 7 buttons while minimizing GPIO usage on our MCU.

    The key is to create a CNT block that is fed by a button.
    Each block is multi-purposed. In the components list all available blocks are listed, of these several of the 3-bit and 4-bit LUTs could be repurposed into CNT blocks.
    The trick to button debouncing is to measure the delay the button stays low. In this case I fed in OSC/64 to get a 390.625 Hz frequency. The counter counts 15 ticks and is helpful enough to provide a typical delay time of 40.96ms, a healthy debounce delay.  Note the Non-inverted(OUT) which will send a low signal after 40.96ms (button is connected to GND).

    Generating an Interrupt

    The next step is to combine the outputs of the debouncers into one pin that goes high when any button is pressed. This is also straightforward.


    Using a combination of LUTs I'm able to generate the appropriate high value on Pin 10 when any button is pressed. To get this right it took a lot of trial and error as what I thought was appropriate logic usually ended up backwards from what I was expecting.

    But Wait, How Do You Read the Button State?

    This is where the magic of the Greenpak comes into play. I2C.

    Pins 8 and 9 on my particular Greenpak are hardwired for I2C. By default the Greenpak will listen for address 0x00, which is a poor design choice for shared buses. It can be overridden in the design tool which is exactly what I did as the Greenpak lives on a shared bus on our badge.

    It turns out all the Greenpak is 256 bytes of ROM (writeable once by a dev kit or factory) and 256 bytes of RAM which the ROM is copied into on startup. All LUT states are stored in RAM and addressable over I2C. WOW. You just need to know where to look in the datasheet - it turns out it's more trial and error than I thought.

    The CNT blocks from earlier share their output state in a single byte at address 0xF2. Getting the state of each button is a simple bitmask. All the MCU has to do is listen for a rising edge on the interrupt pin then read 0xF2 to check the button states.

    Getting our own part number

    Something completely unexpected, when Dialog flashed our Greenpaks they also...

    Read more »

  • Badge ARG / Console / Command Line Puzzle / Whatevs U Call it

    Hyr0n05/14/2018 at 16:04 1 comment

    So the best way to start this log is brutal honesty, I just don't know what to call it. It could be that I was up late coding the badge and watching Westworld until a few hours before my flight (then decided to pack last minute). It could be due to the morning airport mimosas, ginger-ale, and vodka cheersing my liver at 30000 feet right now too. Probably a combo of "all the above."

    There's many different words we all use for the same thing here. Originally, in the Joe Grand days of badgery, you would just hear of them being called hardware hacking challenges. Then it turned into puzzles. Then devices like the Sparkfun Harp started using the term Alternate Reality Gaming (ARG) / Hardware Alternate Reality Prototype (HARP), since it was an electronic hardware based puzzle that went beyond the device using external mediums and a story line to immerse the player in a challenge beyond the puzzle itself. Well this year we've increased the hacker difficulty from simple Easter eggs to actual hacking challenges on the badge, which are accessed through a command line interface / UART console, text based adventure RPG...ARG...thing; think of playing Colossal Cave but your actions in the game use the badge hardware to cause things to happen..in real life. As you can see it's a lot of stuff, but overall it's a bunch of hacker challenges, meant to entice you for some fun, and perhaps the first few people who solve the AND!XOR "thing" will get something special... 

    Can we agree on wut 2 call this?

    But first things first, help us name this shit. Nothing surprises us more than the creativeness of the internet. Do your worst internet, do your worst. We 100%  promise to use whatever recieves the most votes, but please lets make it somewhat describe the fact that this is a challenge, a puzzle, a type of ARG, etc... For the purposes of this write up, I'll refer to it simply as "the console."

    TAKE A QUICK SURVEY AND LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

    Prior Work At Consoling

    We have used embedded UART one way or another on our past two badges. We're hackers, we like command like interfaces, especially when it's green on black. DC24 Bender had an integrated console over UART, solving a couple of puzzles and discovering Easter eggs provided unlocks on the badge (more bling, games, etc). Last years DC25 bender built on that concept, except the console was done over Bluetooth from a fone app @bitstr3m wrote, and allowed anyone to wirelessly terminal in to your badge. It dovetailed in to our BOTNET game as a backdoor in about 500 badges with a default root password... but... more people downloaded it AFTER the CON when they got home to mess with the badge than during the CON (we had about 70 people using the wireless console during DC25). So... metrics...lessons learned, going back to an embedded console (non RF based for interfacing) and focusing more on a single player aspect of hacking challenges.

    By hacking challenges, we mean that yes you will actually hack the badge. Not dumb shit life hack it "e.g. hack BUTTON with FINGER" (okay there is some of that...) but actually attempt to circumvent the security of the badge presented in this alternate text based world in order to achieve intel and l337ness. I am not going to give hints as to what those types of challenges will be (since that would ruin the surprise), but they involve the various skill-sets you would find throughout the DEF CON Villages. They also are limited to things we can do with our badge, which includes LEDs (blinks, colors), RF (Wifi and Bluetooth), Hardware Interfaces (Shitty, I2C, SPI,  JTAG), etc... So if you do not understand how to accomplish a certain type of challenge, this is your queue to go get a bunch of beer / liquor / wine / absinthe / defcoin and...

    Read more »

  • Kickstarter Funding Successful

    Hyr0n05/11/2018 at 02:21 0 comments

    It's been a month since we launched and crowdfunded our DC26 project on Kickstarter. W00t!  It was later than last year, so the HaD page being kicked off is happening a bit later, but that's okay :) 

    So to sum up what we've been working on? Refining the badge-craft, a different take on blinky layout, as well as better silkscreen art from our friend Doc and a western theme. Based on feedback from folks, were upgrading (and completely rewriting) BOTNET from the ground up to be different. Single player games will be on the badge for line con, and a multitude of badge hacking puzzles for your weekend challenge. We are also supporting the #Defcon 26 Shitty Add-Ons interface as well as adding in some secret lulz and hacks for a surprise at the con.

    Aside from that...from DC25 until now, we were lucky enough to speak at the Hackaday SuperCon about our thoughts on the engineering process behind making badges and MacroFab had us on their podcast when we went to their fab site in Houston and saw our prototypes being made.

    More technical details coming shortly, were getting ready to lock down the functions this month, so in the mean time watch that youtube video and listen to the MEP! 

View all 4 project logs

  • 1
    Build Instructions
    1.  Back us on Kickstarter OR
    2.  Find us in Vegas OR
    3.  Wait until after DEF CON when we share everything on GitHub and post the real build instructions

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Discussions

Alex Hammer wrote 05/15/2018 at 20:25 point

Will this badge support custom bling like the Bender S Thompson badge? If so, same steps to create?

  Are you sure? yes | no

Zapp wrote 05/15/2018 at 20:31 point

Yes in a way. Stay tuned, all will make sense soon.

  Are you sure? yes | no

ꝺeshipu wrote 05/14/2018 at 18:18 point

That would look so much better with a black silkscreen...

  Are you sure? yes | no

Zapp wrote 05/14/2018 at 21:57 point

Exactly, that's the plan. Macrofab let's us pick any color we like as long as it's red and white for prototypes.

  Are you sure? yes | no

ꝺeshipu wrote 05/14/2018 at 22:07 point

Nice! Is that an ST7735 display? I love them for their large pixels. Can't really appreciate pixel art properly on the denser ones.

  Are you sure? yes | no

Zapp wrote 05/15/2018 at 20:30 point

Different display. Larger and more pixels. More FPS. More Bling.

  Are you sure? yes | no

ꝺeshipu wrote 05/15/2018 at 20:42 point

Aww, more pixels is not necessarily an advantage. That means more memory for all the graphics and when the pixels are too small, you can't appreciate the pixelart anymore.

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kevin.pentecost wrote 01/09/2018 at 19:39 point

Will there be a project fund page?

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Hyr0n wrote 03/19/2018 at 01:50 point

59 45 53 21 0a

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the1rob wrote 11/29/2017 at 22:08 point

That room chiller thing is throwing me for a loop.

  Are you sure? yes | no

Hyr0n wrote 11/29/2017 at 23:49 point

This year's badge get's hot

  Are you sure? yes | no

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