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Working on Version 4

A project log for 3D Printable Robot Arm

A printable robot arm, a little bigger than the usual hobby servo once.

Andreas Hoelldorfer 09/11/2015 at 20:469 Comments

I'm working on a new version based on the experience I made with the previous versions.

The plan is to use stepper motors and timing belt gears.

The plan is to use a Nema23 stepper for the rotary base,

Joint one and two will be Nema24 ( this: http://www.omc-stepperonline.com/dual-shaft-cnc-stepper-motor-nema-24-100mm-4nm566-ozin-24hs393008d-p-388.html )

Joint 3 and 4 Regular Nema17 stepper and for the 5 joint a HerkuleX DRS-0101 .

But nothing is final now.

Power supply will be 24V-36V I guess.

Discussions

tlankford01 wrote 09/13/2015 at 20:53 point

Wow great job!!!  you have come a long ways on this arm

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jupdyke wrote 09/12/2015 at 17:46 point

Great. When you upload the inventor files please make a .step of the assembly. That will allow other people to import into other programs as well. I am looking forward to printing out a version and having it at my desk at work. I think my work needs more robots. Haha. 

If I can help you in anyway please let me know.  I have access to two full machine shops. I know you want it to be 3d printed. But if i can help let me know. 

Josh

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Alex Rich wrote 09/12/2015 at 10:46 point
I can't wait to print one of these as well, but from the look of it this will be a major challenge on consumer grade printers. Shouldn't be a problem for the $30,000 Stratasys I have access to at work though. A great way to share this would be in OnShape. That lets you spin the model, modify it, export in any format you want, and branch it to make modifications and share those mods with the world as well.

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Andreas Hoelldorfer wrote 09/12/2015 at 12:55 point

I'm printing everything with my homemade delta printer. I only design parts you can print with an FDM machine. 

The onShape thing looks interesting, but currently I use Inventor, maybe at a later stage. 

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Alex Rich wrote 09/12/2015 at 13:05 point

Cool, looking forward to your new version.  With onshape you don't have to design in the program, once your design is stable just upload your STEP file or parasolid assembly to it and use it as a way to share.  The nice thing is people can open the model, spin around, hide/show things, as well as branch your design and modify it directly in the program.  Just a neat possibility, I may do it for some of my projects that I designed in Solidworks.

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jupdyke wrote 09/12/2015 at 17:48 point

Just another option since you said you have SolidWorks, is eDrawings. It is free and can do all the same things. But I am gonna have to check out OnShape too.

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jupdyke wrote 09/12/2015 at 06:19 point

Also, what CAD package are you modeling your parts in? And will you upload your files to somewhere such as GrabCad? .STLs are good for printing, but not making any modifications. It would be great to have .STEP or .IGES files as well so others can import into any CAD package they use.

Thank you.

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jupdyke wrote 09/12/2015 at 06:07 point

Wow. You have done an amazing job. I have been looking for a new side project to keep my 3d printer busy making things while I am at work. How close is Version 4 to being ready for someone to print? Or should I print one of the older versions? What program are you using to make your files?

Again, great work and keep it going.

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Andreas Hoelldorfer wrote 09/12/2015 at 08:49 point

I use Autodesk Inventor 2016, and I will put them online in the next weeks. 

I also changed a lot of the parts should now fit on a standard print bed (200x200x150mm) they are also smaller but more, so it should be easier to print. 

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