Instructions:

   The transmitter and receiver coils are made from 100 turns of 29 gauge magnet copper wire.  The transistor used was an IRFP460 n-Channel mosfet.  A 100 ohm resister was connected to the gate of the mosfet as well as one of the wires of the transmitter coil.  A small induction toroidal choke was also connected to the gate and the drain of the mosfet.  The source of the mosfet was connected to the negative terminal of the battery or DC power source.  The center tap of the transmitter coil was connected to the positive terminal of the battery or DC power source.  A 470 uf radial electrolytic capacitor 16v was also connected to the center tap of the transmitter coil and to the source of the mosfet.  Two (or three) 820 pf polypropylene box capacitors 100v were connected to the outer two wires of the transmitter coil.  The power supply provided 3 to 8 volts to the transmitter circuit.   It is also worth noting that using a simple LED requiring about 3 to 8 volts was approximately the minimum and maximum amount of electricity that it was able to receive wirelessly.  Also note, if the circuit only allows for 3 - 8 volts to achieve optimum resonant inductive coupling “tuning” between the transmitting and receiving coils, there would invariably be some loss of electricity during the transfer thereby limiting the type of bulb to be used.

  Note that the coil on the receiver side does not use a center tap as does the transmitter coil.  The two outer wires on the receiver coil are attached to two (or three) 820 pf polypropylene box capacitors 100v.  A small induction toroidal choke was included in the circuit and attached to both sides of the capacitors.  Finally, a small red LED was used in the receiving circuit.