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LUMOS: Smart Lamp for Better Sleep

Lumos mimics the natural light of the Sun in order to regulate sleep-inducing hormones & improve sleep using Machine Learning

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Lumos mimics the natural light of the Sun in order to regulate sleep-inducing hormones & improve sleep using Machine Learning

There are plenty of smart lighting systems out there that let you change light colors and dim with just your smartphone (or even your voice), but this Open Source lamp called Lumos is a smart lighting system that works to benefit your health.

Lumos mimics the natural light of the sun as it passes overhead each day, generating bright blue light in the morning and warmer amber light in the evening.

Decades of research from Harvard Medical School , NASA , and leading institutions around the world have revealed a great deal of information about how light impacts and regulates our health. They explain that blue light aids in the production of cortisol, which is important to give the human body energy in the morning, and red light aids in the production of sleep-inducing melatonin.

Almost 20% of the world's population is sleep deprived & possibly spends more than 8 hours a day under an unnatural light, which can throw off the body’s internal clock and prevent it from performing at optimum levels.

The Lumos smart lamp aims to change that by pairing with WiFi and uses Machine Learning to adjust the light to match your sleep schedule.

Develop:

Are you a programmer, engineer or designer who has a great idea for a new feature in Lumos? Maybe you have a good idea for a bug fix? Feel free to grab our code, schematics & CAD files from Github and tinker with it.

  • 1 × MDF Sheet 5mm, 60cm*60cm
  • 1 × Frosted Acrylic Sheet 5mm, 60cm*60cm
  • 1 × Mica Sheet 1mm, 2m*1m
  • 1 × RGB LED Strip 12V, 5m
  • 1 × Raspberry Pi Raspberry Pi 3 or Raspberry Pi Zero

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  • 1
    Mechanical Design


    Specifications:

    MDF Base: Outer Radius: 26 cm, Inner Radius: 20 cm.

    Frosted Acrylic Diffuser: Outer Radius: 26 cm, Inner Radius: 20 cm.

    Mica Support Rings: Width: 4 cm, Thickness: 1 mm, Outer Ring Length: 164 cm, Inner Ring Length: 126 cm.

    The circular lower base of the lamp is made out a 5mm MDF Sheet whereas the top circular diffuser is made out of a 5mm Frosted Acrylic Sheet. The laser cutter files for both the base & diffuser are in the Github Repository. The base & diffuser are supported by two rings made out of 1mm Mica Strips. The distance between the diffuser & the base is 4cm. Using a Mica cutting blade, cut the two Mica strips which will form the Mica support rings. The inner circle from the remaining MDF sheet once laser cut can be used to laser cut the Electronics Enclosure Box.

  • 2
    Mechanical Assembly

    Start by marking the drill holes on the ends of each mica strip using the template attached below. Once the holes have been marked & drilled, bring both ends of the mica strip together such that the holes on each end are aligned. Do this for both of the mica strips which form the two support rings.

    Using the leather string, weave a knot between the holes in order to securely join the two ends of the mica strips. Do this for both of the mica strips which form the two support rings. You will now have two Mica support rings: Outer & Inner Ring with a radius of 52 cm & 40 cm respectively.

    Using a mixture of Super Glue/ Instant Adhesive & Baking Soda, stick the support rings to the inner & outer edges of the MDF Base. Drill a hole for the power & control wires at the bottom of the MDF base.

  • 3
    Electronic Assembly

    The Raspberry Pi uses Wi-Fi to get the location specific time zone & also uses its internal Bluetooth Module to analyze RSSI values of a Smartphone in order to calculate proximity of the smartphone

    The Arduino is used to control & test the analog values which control the intensity of the RGB LED Strip. By changing the analog value using PWM we can control the color produced by the LED Strip.

    The Arduino can only supply a maximum of 5V, 20mA through its I/O pins. Whereas the RGB LED Strip generally requires a power source of minimum 12V, 1A.

    The solution to this is using a MOSFET as a switch. The Gate pin of the MOSFET can be used to control the ON/ OFF state of the MOSFET. The Source pin is connected to LED Strip while the Drain pin is connected to Ground. Each Gate pin of a MOSFET is controlled by a separate PWM pin on the Arduino. The LED Strip has 4 pins: +12V, R, G & B. The +12V is connected to the +12V of the 12V power adapter. The R, G & B pins are connected to Source of each MOSFET respectively.

    The Arduino makes it easy to calibrate the colors of the RGB LED Strip. Calibration of the RGB values varies with the manufacturer & model of the RGB LED Strip. If calibration is achieved, the cost can be reduced by using an appropriate Digital to Analog Converter(DAC).

    The Raspberry Pi & Arduino communicate using the I2C protocol.

    The Eagle CAD files & Schematics are attached in the Github repository.

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Discussions

Kirschner Christoph wrote 10/01/2017 at 09:08 point

Cool project!! Right now I'm playing around with some ws2812 (adressable RGB-leds) for a project of mine. Those LEDs are quite simple to use and could be a good alternative for you maybe. :)
Have a nice day!!

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zakqwy wrote 10/01/2017 at 01:11 point

This is a neat project, the aesthetic design of the lamp is quite nice. 

A few years ago, I played around with an RGB LED pixel strip (addressable, in this case) and wanted to recreate various colors temperatures using R,G,B equivalent values generated by a web-based tool. To my eye, the LEDs emulated a dimmed incandescent (in the 2000K range) well enough, but had trouble producing daylight and higher-K thermal bulbs (halogen, etc). I don't have a spectrometer to verify this in any meaningful way, it was just a feeling.

Have you noticed the same effect? My hunch is that the issue is a product of the peakiness of an LED spectrum, but maybe good diffusion and LED selection helps that. What are your thoughts?

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Jonathan Pereira wrote 09/29/2017 at 21:38 point

Are you a programmer, engineer or designer who has a great idea for a new feature in Lumos? Maybe you have a good idea for a bug fix? Feel free to grab our code, schematics & CAD files from Github and tinker with it.

Feel free to ask me any questions about the build process, mechanical or electronic assembly & design, code, schematics, etc

  Are you sure? yes | no

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