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ELLO 2M

The DIY laptop built entirely from PCB

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Presenting a laptop built ENTIRELY from PCB .

No plastic enclosure, no moulds, no mechanical parts.
The whole laptop is built as a thin stack of 6 PCBs with carefully designed shape and thickness. Add to those a 7" display touch panel and a battery, and that's everything it is. Eight components all in all, you can see them in one of the pictures. That makes it easy for assembling by almost anyone.
I have even tried to work out a little bit of aesthetic design with the PCBs side plated with gold, round corners, etc...

The hardware is not aiming for astonishing quantities, and is built around the popular Micromite MMbasic (PIC32MX470-120), plus a number of added small hardware extras - three microSD drives (one internal), RF transceiver, RTC, serial NVM, buzzer, and... a nice solderless prototyping space built from four PGA sockets, for electronic experiments.

The idea behind is not to boast with top parameters, but to make a nice and cute pure entry level machine

There are a few things about this computer, which I am really proud of. First, it is thin, I mean really thin - 6.4mm total in its thinnest configuration without the sockets. In size it is just about a standard A4 sheet.


The keyboard design was fun. It is the top two panels, the first one being the keyboard layout with cutouts at suitable locations, so the buttons can be pushed. The PCB underneath is to provide a frame for the buttons and also to raise the panel so the buttons can be pushed. There is a separate microcontroller PIC16F1517 which takes care of scanning the keyboard and communicating with the MM+ via the console port, also controlling the power supply to everything and controlling an RGB status LED as well. It is the only part in the schematic which is on at all times. The keyboard optionally can be backlit as well.


In order to reach this thin size I had to dump the use of pre-assembled display modules, and built the SSD1963-based display and XPT2046 touch controller on the main board.


The laptop also has three micro-SD cards, one is permanently built-in emulating a 'hard drive', the other two and removable. You can see them on the right side of the keyboard. It also has internal serial FRAM for data and code storage.


There is also an 'expansion port', which is a single row standard square pin receptacle. The whole laptop is powered and charged via micro-USB connector, which can be used also as console for the MM+ for the initial configuration.

Additionally there is a really cool RF module built-in, which essentially emulates a wireless UART connection and also has an internal stack with ability for simple networking with similar devices. The range (by specs) is about 100 metres.


Of course there is a real-time clock with a built-in coin battery as well. And a small buzzer.

All this may sound really complex, but in fact the whole laptop is only nine chips and some moderate number of discrete components, connectors and other stuff. You can see it in the picture.

My plan is to make this available to DIY hobbyists and entry level users in three possible configurations - bare PCB kit, 'assemble it yourself' kit with populated main board, and a fully assembled laptop. Currently considering options how to take it further.

In short, my concept behind this laptop is to give in the hands of the kids something simple and friendly, just like the old 8-bit machines from our time. Something that will not focus on gigabytes and gigahertz, a massive OS, or other stuff of the sort, where a learner would most probably end up as a user of premade software, but the thing that inspires creativity without distracting with greed.

Of course needless to say - once I release it, the project will be open-source.

  • New updates and video

    KnivD01/29/2017 at 22:37 0 comments

    Posted a new video and update in the Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1190587984388833/

    Check also Youtube for the new videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqTtNn7b951O1GqkDLMm4jg

  • Unprogrammed PIC32

    KnivD01/05/2017 at 16:31 0 comments

    It looks like some people have received ELLO systems with blank PIC32 chip. This is something that wasn't supposed to happen since I explicitly ordered pre-programmed chips from Microchip Direct. No idea what is the reason for that and apologise if that has happened to someone.

    The good thing is that the system can be programmed easily with Pickit3, ICD3, or some other compatible programmer. I have released the most current HEX file for ELLO 2M (not 2M²!) in the project's page on GitHub: https://github.com/knivd/ELLO-2M/

    The file is called "MicromitePlus_ELLO_2M.hex".

    On the expansion connector there is access to the PIC32's programming lines. Connect the programmer's data line to the pin marked "PGD", the clock line goes to "PGC", and the reset line to "MCLR" (not "MCLRK"). Connect a wire from the programmer's ground to one of the ground pins on the connector. Do the same with the 3.3V line.

    Switch the system on and it should be ready for uploading the hex into the chip. Reset it after programming and everything should be working fine.

  • Facebook group

    KnivD01/02/2017 at 15:57 0 comments

    All owners and supporters of ELLO are welcome to join the new Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1190587984388833/

  • ELLO 2M assembly including keyboard patching

    KnivD12/28/2016 at 18:24 0 comments

    People asked me how to assemble the keyboard. I am planning to shoot a new assembly video as soon as I can, but until then...

    The self-adhesive pads supplied with ELLO are mean to go on the back side of the front board (called Panel). The assembly of the machine ALWAYS starts with attaching the fourteen standoffs to the front panel. Make sure you also remove the lid covering the prototyping space. You can either carefully snap it off, or cut the holding pieces using sharp cutters.

    The place the panel face down (the standoffs will tall up), and start inserting the other PCBs in thus formed frame. The first one to go next is PCB0. Just like with the panel - if there is a lid covering the prototyping space, just snap it off or cut. Round up the remaining stumps a little bit, if necessary.

    When PCB0 is in the stack, NOW is the time to put the patches. Carefully stick all of them in their places using the top line as reference.

    Here is how the frame looks after the operation

    Again, use the top line as reference, i.e. insert a patch into its frame until it hits the top and then stick. Thus you will guarantee that the keys are moving freely in their frames.

    After patching the keyboard, the next to follow is the computer's main board - PCB1. Place it face down (components must be facing up).

    Next - install the display panel face down in its place, and connect it to the connector on PCB1. Stick one of the two supplied round 3M double-sided adhesive patches on the back of the LCD (don't remove its top cover yet).

    Stick the second 3M patch somewhere in the in centre of large black area marked for the battery. Remove the top cover as well. Then connect the battery (make absolutely sure that red wire goes to the contact marked '+', and black wire goes to the contact marked '-'). Then carefully stick the battery on the 3M patch in such way that it does not extend over the boundaries marked with lines on PCB1. Tidy up the battery wires so they don't go over the display cable, but around it. With poor assembly you might experience poor picture on the screen as well due to noise, so this is pretty important, actually.

    Now install PCB2 again face down. The prototyping sockets must go in their spot. If they can't, that means there is a stump remaining on PCB0. Round it up a bit more and then install PCB2.

    PCB3 follows next.

    Now it is the time to remove the top cover from the 3M path that is already stuck on the back of the LCD. But don't do that yet, and do this little trick instead.

    Install the final PCB4 and screw in the bottom two corner screws so it is fixed in its place. Now bend the top side slightly up to reach under it and remove the top cover from the 3M patch which is on the LCD. Carefully release the board back in its place and screw in tightly all screws.

    Your new ELLO 2M is ready to dance.

  • First MMBasic Addendum document for ELLO 2M

    KnivD12/26/2016 at 14:03 1 comment

    First, Merry Christmas to all!

    These days I finally had some time to sit and type this document which was long overdue. It is not a full MMBasic manual (those have already been written by its author), but focuses more on the additions on ELLO from user's perspective. I will keep updating this document when I can with the hope that one day it will become a full book for ELLO. If anyone else is interested in helping as well, please let me know.

    The file is now in the project's GitHub repository: https://github.com/knivd/ELLO-2M

  • Problem solved (so it seems)

    KnivD11/17/2016 at 20:36 1 comment

    It looks like things are not as bad as they looked a few days ago when I discovered the issue with the soldermaks in the keyboard combs. Have been thinking about solutions and tried Velostat (unsuccessfully). There is of course always the option for chemical treatment but I wanted to see first if there is some more user-friendly way. So the good old Microchip came to save the day once again :-)

    Just received from them a box with sample chips for unrelated project. The chips have no connection here, but the box caught my attention, and especially the black foam inside.

    So I took the scissors and cut two pieces to fit into the key holes in the PCB0 frame board. The miracle happened - the keys worked perfectly fine! In fact so well that I started feeling sorry that I was so quick to revise the board, and even considering whether to make this the standard way for building ELLO keyboards.

    Obviously now the challenge in front of me - to identify where to buy this foam and more especially to have it with the right thickness (0.5-0.7mm) and cut into small square and rectangular pieces as per given specs. Searching and welcoming any information about it.

    Getting really close to the finish now...

  • No luck this time...

    KnivD11/12/2016 at 21:03 10 comments

    Well, it's time for the first bad report... :-(

    Received the production samples. Excellent build. In fact so much excellent that it has created a problem on it own.

    In the earlier prototypes I used to work with a different PCB factory which had more limited production capacity and less precise equipment. The result of that - working prototypes. This time the new factory has equipment which is apparently much better and has managed to run soldermask between the teeth of the keyboard comb pads. Result - keyboard not working unless some other techniques are used, such as additional rubber pads, etc. The reason for that is because the soldermask is taller than the exposed copper in the pads and the panel contacts can't create the needed short in the comb. Grrr... :-(

    I have fixed the PCB file now to force soldermask expansion (should have done that long time ago!), but now the big question in front of me - what to do with all those first batch manufactured systems with damn non-operation keyboard combs? Trying to think of a quick solution to patch them so people can receive them sooner. So far my ideas are circling around additional self-adhesive conductive rubber pads (tried them with success), or some sort of thin elastic conductive sheet to stick under the keyboard panel (no idea if such thing exists at all).

    It is very frustrating problem that needs a quick and clever solution...

  • Release samples ready

    KnivD11/06/2016 at 11:15 3 comments

    The first three fully manufactured samples are on their way to me from the factory.

    To make everyone's life easier I have also added in the kit a small screwdriver and two self-adhesive pads to keep the LCD panel and the battery securely in place. Obviously a pack of screws and standoffs as well. The battery now is wired with a small 2-pin connector, so it won't be needed to be soldered making it easier for assembly by users with no soldering equipment or abilities.

    Once I verify and confirm these three systems (will probably publish a new YouTube video soon), people will start receiving their ELLO 2M systems.

    Maybe should put together a one-page printed instruction for assembly to be included in the box as well... Ugh.

  • License update

    KnivD10/09/2016 at 14:25 5 comments

    This log is probably a little overdue and people already know this, but in case anyone has missed it - I have managed to negotiate the licensing conditions for MMbasic for ELLO. So no more issues on that front, whoohooo!

    Ah, did I mention the packaging carton box? Yes, there will be one. The design is probably slightly simplistic and controversial, that's the way I like it to be :)

  • Shortlisted in Elektra 2016 awards

    KnivD09/13/2016 at 11:27 5 comments

    The ELLO 2M project is in the final shortlist stage for the annual Elektra European Electronics Industry Awards 2016, which is due in December: http://www.elektraawards.co.uk/elektraawards2016/shortlist-2016

    It is listed as "Yellow Beak Computer Ltd" in the "Educational Support" category. Among the six finalists it is the ONLY entry which is NOT coming from a large corporation, and I consider that as I great recognition for the project.

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Discussions

Bartosz wrote 03/13/2017 at 14:20 point

How power using this machine? Is possible to using solar panel? many people need small machine for e-mail or srd completly offgrid. Think about it.

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Martian wrote 01/25/2017 at 07:17 point

Beautiful machine, really nice.

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Dirk Wouters wrote 01/08/2017 at 21:49 point

Be the "Ello 2M²" already sent too? And do you we get an email with the tracking number when the delivery has been sent?

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KnivD wrote 01/10/2017 at 15:19 point

It is still in manufacturing. Are you expecting one? They will be shipped probably in early February.

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Dirk Wouters wrote 01/10/2017 at 15:25 point

Yes, I had chosen the 2M² version. Hard time, waiting so long...  ;-) 

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Brian Whitman wrote 01/03/2017 at 19:15 point

My PCB1's keyboard was covered in clear yellow tape and I didn't know i had to remove it. I now have ST turning solid blue after holding down CTRL and ON, but nothing on the screen (yet!) 

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KnivD wrote 01/03/2017 at 20:03 point

Can you talk to the device (when it is on) via USB? Does is appear as serial port on your computer?

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Brian Whitman wrote 01/04/2017 at 16:41 point

No-- no new usbserial / modems in /dev/tty* / dev/cu*, and nothing in Mac OS X system profiler or USB prober. 

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KnivD wrote 01/04/2017 at 17:15 point

Well, that looks like unprogrammed PIC32... Are you able to program it yourself? Alternatively please leave me a PM and we will organise you to send it to me so I can do it for you

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Brian Whitman wrote 01/03/2017 at 13:17 point

Hi! I got my Ello the other day, thank you! I put it together and all I see is a flashing "ST" light -- maybe once every 8 seconds. Any idea how to proceed to debug? 

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KnivD wrote 01/03/2017 at 13:32 point

Excellent. Flashing ST is the normal operational mode. Have you seen this document?

https://github.com/knivd/ELLO-2M/blob/master/ELLO 2M - Addendum.pdf

It should explain to you how to switch on, off, etc...

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Brian Whitman wrote 01/03/2017 at 13:34 point

Yes, i did see that. When I hold control-ON for a few seconds nothing changes -- nothing on the screen, light still blinking. 

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KnivD wrote 01/03/2017 at 13:41 point

Did you install the conductive pads under the keyboard panel?

https://hackaday.io/project/9692/log/50928-ello-2m-assembly-including-keyboard-patching

The way you describe it means it is not switching on, otherwise ST should become permanent blue.

Reasons for why it is not switching on could be not installed conductive pads on the keyboard, poorly installed pads so one or more of them keeps permanent contact on, not holding Ctrl when pressing [On], or not holding both for long enough. I can't think of any other possible reason.

If you have no luck at all switching on, remove the front panel and try to simulate pressed "Ctrl" and [On] by using some of the excess conductive pads or create short between the combs of those two keys in any other way.

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Dirk Wouters wrote 12/21/2016 at 22:17 point

Is there any news? Maybe a nice Christmas surprise? ;-) 

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KnivD wrote 12/22/2016 at 08:02 point

They are being shipped at the moment :)

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Dirk Wouters wrote 12/22/2016 at 08:12 point

Cool, thank you! :-) 

Is there a website with tutorials, examples, etc.?

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KnivD wrote 12/22/2016 at 13:22 point

Not yet... I have the plan to launch ello.cc sometime in the near future, but it will be a slow process without input from other people.

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Dirk Wouters wrote 12/22/2016 at 14:52 point

Where can I get now information to get started? How are the SD cards used, command overview of programming language, etc. Without information, it will be hard to find the entry. ;-) 

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KnivD wrote 12/22/2016 at 15:50 point

ELLO 2M uses MMBasic. There is a small number of additional commands and features to handle the multiple SD cards, etc. I am currently working on a document describing all additions, and that should be available for release very soon.

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Thierry Deval wrote 10/19/2016 at 22:18 point

Hello,

I've seen today that ELLO 2M has been elected as the project of the month @ CircuitMaker.

Congrats !!!

On a side note, how is the 2M² going ?  I've not yet seen much files about it.

T.

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KnivD wrote 10/20/2016 at 08:01 point

Thanks! It was a total surprise for me. And a great honour, considering the size of the CM community.
2M² has been ready for long time. The MMbasic port for it...

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Thierry Deval wrote 10/20/2016 at 12:26 point

I didn't update git for a while.
I now see the 2M² MZEF archives too.  :-)

Thanks,

T.

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Trevor Johansen Aase wrote 09/20/2016 at 04:21 point

Saw a thumbnail and it caught my eye immediately! I love the all PCB and gold edge especially but how the heck much is this to manufacture?? It cost me $40 just for a 6x6 panel with no quality controls!

I would love a version with a Pi Zero as a brain and I would make the prototyping area modular with an i2c connection so you could have "learning modules". Combine that with a "Learning To Code" and "Learning Electronics" like the pi tops and kid me would bug my mom for christmas!

Licensing question, GPL3 is mostly a software licence so if I were to modify and build my own what kind of attribution is required outside of a version notice stating the original and my modifications dated? If I do mod one I will just fork the github so you can use any changes if they are useful to you.

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KnivD wrote 09/20/2016 at 05:56 point

Manufacturing 6 PCBs with this size is certainly not a few bucks exercise, but it is not incredibly expensive either. I am working with two particular companies - NOA Labs and H&W Electronic.

Raspberry, and in general all ARM-based systems are against my understanding for 'simple machine' so that's why I didn't use any ARM in the design. Still had to make a compromise with myself by putting the PIC32 in there... But if you feel a version with Pi Zero is what you want to make, please be welcome. Just make your design open so other people can use it as well.

The prototyping area can be improved much, I know. It is associated with other challenges, but is on my radar for the future anyway.

As to the license, I chose the simplest possible license there. In summary - you are free to copy, modify, distribute, and in general do whatever you want with it.

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Trevor Johansen Aase wrote 09/20/2016 at 12:06 point

Awesome, thanks for the effort you have done so far. I have a laser cutter so I will be able to iterate designs quickly and cheaply with a few ideas I have. 

I started out on a C64 and Vic-20 so BASIC has some fond memories. Another option is to run embedded python and a REPL on the PIC32 which would allow much more complex uses.

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alan_r_cam wrote 09/19/2016 at 03:23 point

Looks nice. 
Can't see the schematics at Circuitmaker - they want to install software on my PC.  Github is better.

Now I just need to update my PDF software to a version that reads 3D [grin]...

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Mark Sherman wrote 09/13/2016 at 15:40 point

it's like a modern TRS80 100.   :-)  

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Dirk Wouters wrote 08/04/2016 at 17:24 point

Are there any news about the 2M² Hacker version? Especially the availability of MMBasic in shipment? 

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KnivD wrote 08/04/2016 at 17:55 point

There will be news very soon. Obviously during the holiday season things are generally going at a slower pace, but the Hacker system with functioning MMBasic will be ready sometime in early to mid September and people who supported the funding campaign will start receiving their systems around that type

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Lorenzo Lucchini wrote 06/02/2016 at 01:45 point

Can the microUSB socket be used as actual USB, which I believe the PIC32 does have, or is it only for charging?

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KnivD wrote 06/02/2016 at 05:22 point

Yes, it can (and is) used as USB as well, currently as virtual COM port where you can connect a terminal

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Lorenzo Lucchini wrote 06/13/2016 at 20:38 point

Why is this not mentioned on the Crowdsupply page (or anywhere else I saw)? Maybe you took it for granted, but it's an important basic feature for many, like the SD slots and other things that are mentioned.

I was almost thinking you intentionally left it out to make it less trivial to connect to "modern" computers and to preserve the "retro" feeling... I had thought the same about the RF module being used instead of a WiFi module.

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James Hall wrote 05/31/2016 at 21:33 point

Wouldn't it be cheaper to use a laser-cut plastic for some of these layers? Or cut the layers up so you aren't using a big sheet of PCB for a little support. It seems like this size of PCB can't be cheap.

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KnivD wrote 06/02/2016 at 05:26 point

It would be cheaper to have the framing panels made from plastic. I am currently exploring that route. It will be much cheaper, however that can only happen for larger scale manufacturing. And it won't be as nice as the earliest PCB-made samples, I think.

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Lorenzo Lucchini wrote 06/14/2016 at 15:13 point

A friend of mine remarked that acrylic, specifically "46 lasercut acrylic frames" would be much cheaper than PCB even in ~100 runs, and sturdy enough if some caveats are taken into account, namely that "if you screw (compression force) down into acrylic you'll shatter it radiating around the hole, especially if it is subject to vibrational forces", and the way to avoid is "you pre-drill and use washers to distribute force, and you can use some sort of grommet through the hole".

I told him to tell you this, but he thought he didn't know enough about it and could end up giving bad advice. So, maybe the above is bad advice. I just shared because, to me, it seems like he kinda knew what he was talking about.

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KnivD wrote 06/14/2016 at 15:30 point

It is not a bad advise at all. I have been considering plastic panels as replacement for the framing PCBs to reduce the cost. It will be much cheaper and of course not as funky, but it can be done easily. The only problem is the initial tooling which costs a lot and is only feasible if there will be enough units manufactured over time

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Tavish Naruka wrote 04/18/2016 at 08:08 point

this is really cool! definitely interested in your crowdsupply campaign.what ballpark pricing do you expect for this?

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KnivD wrote 04/18/2016 at 14:11 point

Thanks for the thumbs up! I am planning to start this campaign really soon and every bit of support is more than welcome.
Unfortunately ELLO is not particularly cheap system (nor that was the goal of it). A fully assembled system is around $200 mark for now.

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jportici wrote 04/06/2016 at 19:16 point

*DISCLAIMER: I have never programmed anything more complex than a microcontroller, yet. never had to use RTOSs*

Do you think it would be possible to implement linux/unix on this?

https://olimex.wordpress.com/2012/04/04/unix-on-pic32-meet-retrobsd-for-duinomite/

This is a fool's dream but i think it would be awesome to write,compile and edit firmware in assembly or C and then upload them to the target circuit... located in the prototype area

-> mentioned unix because you can have a c compiler and this is a microsoft basic interpreter

If this thing could become a programming/debugging tool :)

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KnivD wrote 04/07/2016 at 08:12 point

RetroBSD will work on ELLO without any problems.

Probably NuttX too, although I can only speculate on that one.


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jportici wrote 04/05/2016 at 19:29 point

I love this. 44 likes only? come on.

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Yann Guidon / YGDES wrote 04/05/2016 at 19:49 point

I  wish I could "like" it more than once ;-)

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danjovic wrote 02/22/2016 at 21:34 point

Simply Amazing! 

Just to mention, something like this was what I expected when I first read that BBC was going to release a learning computer. 

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KnivD wrote 02/23/2016 at 08:48 point

Well, it is an interesting coincidence, because the very idea for this one came to me right after I read what they are actually going to deliver.

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Stephen K wrote 02/22/2016 at 14:14 point

I absolutely love the design. 

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jaromir.sukuba wrote 02/21/2016 at 14:54 point

I love the project though I'm unsure about how the keyboard actually works. The upper visible part seems to be "movable" (the key is routed except of tiny bit, allowing it to flex), while the lower part has two comb-like patterns. Are those used for capacitive sensing or is there any conductive material to make connection? Perhaps I overlooked something, but the principle is not obvious to me.

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KnivD wrote 02/21/2016 at 17:51 point

Actually, it works quite well. The flexibility of the top panel is just enough to make the keys soft without being too floppy. For ideal results it is best if the top panel and PCB0 (the one immediately below) are glued together in a few key spots. The top panel has copper on the bottom side of the keys and it makes contact with the combs on the main board. No capacitive connections, just normal contact. There is a specific 'tapping' sound generated by the keys, that's somewhat similar to the old 'clicking' keyboards, but that can be addressed if you don't like it. Just stick small and thin conductive rubber pads under the keys. I have tried that as well, and it works perfectly fine.

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KnivD wrote 02/20/2016 at 21:24 point

Haha, haven't thought about the crumbs. Recommended best solution - don't eat while typing.

The methods are not very trivial - the top panel is a very thin (0.3mm) FR-4 which makes it just enough flexible to be convenient for pressing. On the bottom side all keys have copper. The PCB below the top panel is one with holes for the buttons. It is 1.2mm and determines how deep the keys will go. Then the keys go through the holes and make short between the two lines that create each button on the main board. Then follows another, thicker board that carries the four PGA sockets building the prototyping space. The fourth and fifth PCBs are also used to create the needed cavities for the components on the main board. The sixth PCB is just a lid.

All this exercise because I had no other way to design an enclosure :)

The main challenge was to make everything perfectly aligned so all things fit into their designated spaces.

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Yann Guidon / YGDES wrote 02/21/2016 at 15:52 point

I have found/sourced very thin push-buttons with a tiny dome membrane for better "touch/feel" (you know, tactile feedback when it's pressed). It should have much less electrical parasites/rebound...

My concern was : what is the best thickness for the "spring PCB" ? 0.4mm ? 0.2mm ?

And now that I think about it : the "alveola" PCB could reuse all the PCB squares that were removed, to make the "raised caps". I imagine there is quite a few wasted squares... I should make a drawing !

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KnivD wrote 03/25/2016 at 19:33 point

Hmmm... this with the squares is actually a great idea! The problem is how to get the factory give those as well. Or maybe print the layout of the keys over the cutouts of the frame board below, and they glue them over the top one? I am definitely interested in your suggestion.

So far I have found out that 0.25mm is probably the best thickness for the keyboard panel.

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Yann Guidon / YGDES wrote 03/25/2016 at 20:39 point

It's easy to get these cutouts : just leave a little bit of PCB to keep the junction beteen the squares and the frame/spacer.

This has another benefit : if you do it well, all the squares will be correctly aligned so you can glue/solder them all in one pass. Then you pull/cut/detach the spacer from the squares.

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KnivD wrote 03/25/2016 at 21:33 point

I will try to make a revision of the keyboard frame to test the idea. Thanks

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Yann Guidon / YGDES wrote 03/25/2016 at 21:38 point

I'll be so excited to see the result and test it ! Though not thrilled to invest time in yet another CPU architecture (even if PIC32 is pretty cool, but I only have 24h in a day)

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