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My Off-grid Solar System Monitoring

How I did to remotely control and monitor my home made Off-grid Photo voltaic System

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In May 2013 I decided to equip my house with an Off-grid Photo Voltaic System. My main goal was to become as independent as possible of the Grid. Of course, total independence is currently not achievable due to the lack of sun during the short winter days (November to February) in my area.

Nevertheless, my calculations predicted that my setup should be able to provide as much as 80 % of the needs of my house on a whole year. Furthermore, total independence would be achievable if the surplus of energy produced during the summer months (June, July and August) could be stored for later use in winter (like the squirrels do with nuts). These encouraging figures helped me take my decision to carry out this project.

Last but not least, this project would not have been complete without a comprehensive remote control and monitoring system. You will find hereafter both the description of the electrical setup (energy production) and the monitoring system.

General description

My PV (Photo Voltaic) System comprises the following main parts :

  • the solar field made of 16 solar modules providing 4300 Wp (Watts - peak) of electrical power
  • a solar battery charger converting the 120 V panel output voltage to 48 Volts battery voltage
  • a lead acid battery pack providing energy during night time
  • an inverter transforming the 48 VDC voltage provided by the battery to 230 VAC - 50 Hz for the home appliances
  • a home made On Line Source Selector, capable of switching between Solar and Grid power within 20 ms

How does it work ?

During daytime, the 960 cells of the Solar Field convert the sunlight  (the photons) into electricity. The efficiency of this conversion is 17%. This seems a poor figure, but as the solar power can reach up to 1000 W/m², the Field produces 4300 Watts in these conditions. This is equivalent to the power of 7 horses. Not so bad ! The Solar panels are Yingli Panda 270 Wc modules.

The Battery charger converts the high voltage (120 Volts DC) coming out of the Solar Field into 48 V DC, suitable to battery charging. Due to the continuously changing solar light power, the charger tracks the maximum power point continuously in order to optimise the system's yield. The Battery charger also manages the charging process of the Battery. This device is the most elaborate part of the system. The charger is a Victron Blue Solar Charger 150/70 MPPT .

The Battery gets loaded during daytime and discharged during night time. It can store up to 10 KWh of electricity. This is enough for one day of consumption. This is a short time, but it's weight is still 500 Kgs (1/2 ton). I expect a lifetime of at least 7 years for my batteries. The batteries are 8 Vipiemme 12V/230 AH semi stationary batteries. Increasing the capacity of the Battery pack, without increasing its weight and size is an important challenge for the future.

The Inverter converts the 48 VDC battery voltage into 230 V AC. The rating of the Inverter is 5KW permanent and  10 KW during 5 minutes. Thanks to this large rating, we can use all the classical "energy eating" house appliances like the electric kitchen oven, the dishwasher, the washing machine and even the clothes dryer. When the Inverter supplies 10 KW, the battery current may climb up to 200 Amps. The Inverter is a Victron Phoenix 48V/230V 5KVA inverter.

The Grid is the public electricity network. In France electricity is mainly provided and distributed by EDF (Electricité de France). Nuclear Power Plants produce currently 85 % of the French electricity. To my opinion, electricity is (very) cheap: about 0,12 €/KWh. One can bet that this price will rise a lot once it's time to dismantle the many french worn out nuclear plants. Our children will probably have to pay the bill.

The Source Selector is able to switch between solar energy and Grid energy nearly instantaneously (less than 20 ms). This insures that the energy source change is generally unperceivable to the inhabitants of the house. This prevents also PC and electronic device crashes. The source switching occurs when the battery is too discharged to go on using solar energy, or when the battery is charged again after a dull day. The design of the Source Selector prevents paralleling of the solar system with the Grid at any timeThe Source Selector is a fully personal design.

A few pictures of the System:

The complete Solar Field

The small panel at the center bottom is the measurement panel. This panel measures the available solar power at any time.

At night, a lighting indicates whether the house is supplied by the PV System (Cyan - Blue) or by the Grid (Yellow - Red) 

The house is supplied by the PV SystemThe Grid is currently supplying the house

Inside the house: the battery pack, the inverter and the solar charger (left to right)
The large grey box contains the fuses, circuit breakers and lightning protections. The small one contains the PV Field Monitoring board...

Read more »

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  • 1 × PV Field Monitor board (PVFM) Based on an LPCxpresso LPC1769 Cortex M3 processor. Application written in C. Hardawer and Software are open source
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  • 1 × PV Battery Monitor board (PVBM) Based on an LPCxpresso LPC1769 Cortex M3 processor. Application written in C. Hardawer and Software are open source
  • 1 × On-Line Source Selector (OLSS) Based on a Embedded Artists Android Open Accessory Kit board. Implements an NXP LPC1769 Cortex M3 Processor

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Discussions

Tuomas Salo wrote 09/04/2016 at 10:00 point

Hi Michel!

For connecting the RPi to CAN bus, you're suggesting eg. https://www.cooking-hacks.com/can-bus-module-shield-board-for-arduino-raspberry-pi-intel-galileo. What did you use yourself?

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 09/05/2016 at 08:38 point

Hello Tuomas,

In fact I use the microcontroller dedicated to the Solar Panel management as a gateway between the CAN bus and the Raspberry Pi. The Pi talks with the microcontroller through its serial line available on the expansion connector (/dev/ttyAMA0). The communication on the Pi is managed by a Python script. The communication is very stable and reliable (works during years without any problem) and the throughput is sufficient for my application.

I have avoided to add a specific board to my system, which may be difficult to maintain in the future. Furthermore, the microcontroller had plenty of pins and power left to manage the gateway function overhead.

Regards,

Michel

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Lubem Mtile wrote 07/09/2016 at 12:27 point

Hello Michel,

  i am trying to build a similar system here in Nigeria...my idea actually was for me to be able to
switch of the entire system remotely or switch of my neighbors grid all from a
web page or an android phone , because we were looking at supplying our
neighbors with power. please advice. And thank in anticipation.

Shadrach

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Noeman wrote 01/25/2016 at 21:30 point

Bonsoir Michel,

Vous avez fait un excellent travail, merci beucoup pour le partage.

Concernant la batterie, j'ai vu dans votre site la courbe de sa tension et j'ai remarqué que la tension ne descend pas au desous de 50 V qui est équivalente à 2,08 V par cellule. Je voudrais savoir le profondeur de décharge en pourcentage dans ce cas là et pourquoi ne pas diminuer ce seuil pour profiter davantage de l'espace de stockage.

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thomasromijn1998 wrote 01/10/2016 at 14:29 point

Hello Michel,

I'm Thomas from the Netherlands and I'm building a V20 solar boat. While we're building our boat we found some problems. We want to monitor our solar sytem (how much we load our battery's and discharge them) on the shore.

Your system seems to be perfect for us, but I found a couple of small problems. Our battery has a CAN bus interface, is it possible to connect this directly to the Pi?
We also use an MPPT from Victron, a 150/35, does this also work in this sytem?

I'd like to hear something from your :) Sorry for the bad english

Thomas

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 01/10/2016 at 16:50 point

Hi Thomas,

Your project is really great. Congratulations.

To connect a CAN bus to the Pi, you must add a CAN shield. There are several low cost solutions on the market. This one seems to be cool - not tested by myself :

https://www.cooking-hacks.com/can-bus-module-shield-board-for-arduino-raspberry-pi-intel-galileo

You must make sure that the drivers exist for the chosen board. Galvanic isolation of the bus should not be compulsory (to be verified anyhow...).

Does the MPPT 150/35 have a CAN bus interface? I think not (please confirm). I think it has a VE Direct Bluetooth interface.  to communication with the charger It is also possible to add a BlueTooth module to the Rpi. Victron publishes the VE Direct protocol, so it should be possible to read the infos given by the charger.

To go further please provid following informations:

The type of battery you are using.
The type of BMS

Regards,
Michel

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thomasromijn1998 wrote 01/10/2016 at 17:46 point

Hello Michel,

Thanks for the quick response! The MPPT 150/35 indeed doesn't have a CAN bus port on it. It's an Ve.Direct. On our boat we have installed 2 MPPT's for several reasons.

We use an battery from MG electronics; http://www.mgelectronics.nl/index.php/products/batteries/item/23-mg-solar-battery-1500 There isn't any documentation of it on the internet.

On this battery is standard a BMS installed, which includes a CAN bus port!

I also had a quick look at your documentation/scripts. I have to admit, I'm a bit new to the Rpi, so how did you installed all of this?
Another thing I mentioned when watching some video's, You have a lot electronics installed, what is all of that for?

If you're intrested in our project, here is a link with some info; http://www.vripack.com/portfolio/v20

Regards,
Thomas

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 01/11/2016 at 07:26 point

Hello Thomas,

I suggest we communicate through private email from now on:

my address is: michelDotKuenemannAtGmail.com

Please provide an electrical diagram of the current setup.

Michel

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thomasromijn1998 wrote 01/11/2016 at 15:43 point

Hi,

I've send you an email, I hope to hear from you soon.

Thomas

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Luke wrote 04/03/2017 at 17:45 point

Hi Michel, great project!!  Everything is really interesting.

quick question regarding your answer to Thomas.

I am completely off grid and would like to be able to monitor my house usage and the battery usage, store the data and upload it to a webserver like you have.  I have a victron bmv 702 battery monitor and you mention in your comment that a Pi should be able to read the output from the v.e direct.  How would I go about doing this?  Do you think it would be possible to do it over the new v.e direct bluetooth dongle?  

thanks!





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Amol P wrote 05/24/2015 at 01:48 point

Hi Michel,

      great project! I hope to do something similar one day... well maybe I need my own home first :) Could you summarize the total cost of the project? I didn't find that information anywhere.

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 08/22/2015 at 06:34 point

Hello,

I put a table with the cost of the main system components in a log titled "How much did all this stuff cost ?".

Michel

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dzinworldcup wrote 04/18/2015 at 22:41 point

Bonjour,

Désolé de vous déranger avec mes questions

voila, je voudrais vous demander quelques détails sur l'inverseur de sources

est ce que il permet de commuter entre la phase et le neutre de l'onduleur avec la phase et le neutre du reseau? 

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 04/19/2015 at 00:29 point

Bonjour,

Je réponds avec plaisir à vos questions. Le neutre du réseau, de l'onduleur et le la maison sont reliés en permanence. L'inverseur de source permet de relier la phase de la maison, soit à EDF, soit à l'onduleur. La commutation est effectuée par deux opto triacs Opto22 de type 25A / 250 Volts. l'électronique qui les commande permet de passer d'une source à l'autre en 20 ms, ce qui ne provoque aucune perturbation au niveau des appareils de la maison. Un mécanisme d’inter verrouillage empêche les deux optos de se fermer en même temps, ce qui provoquerait un court-circuit violent car l'onduleur n'est pas synchronisé sur EDF.

Michel

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dzinworldcup wrote 04/19/2015 at 06:50 point

merci beaucoup pour vos réponses

 maintenat , lorsque vous alimentez votre maison en solaire ,est ce que ca alimente toute la maison en solaire, ou bien quelques charges seulement?

c'est pour voire est ce que la distribution ce fait au méme niveau que l'arrivé principale edf ou bien seuelemnt au niveaux des disjoncteurs secondaires.

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 04/19/2015 at 07:56 point

L'installation solaire est capable d'alimenter la totalité de la maison (onduleur 5 KVA permanent, 10 KVA pendant 5 minutes).

 En ce moment, par exemple la machine à laver ainsi que le sèche linge fonctionnent.

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dzinworldcup wrote 04/19/2015 at 12:50 point

Ok,merci beacoup pour vos réponses.

encore une fois merci

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dzinworldcup wrote 03/25/2015 at 11:02 point

Bonjour

SVP pouvez vous me dire quelle type de fusible ou protection avez vous utiliser pour proteger les batteries ,ainsi que le sectionement

Merci 

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 03/25/2015 at 16:26 point

Bonjour,

J'utilise un fusible de 200A et un coupe batterie que j'ai trouvé chez mon fournisseur de batteries. Je ne peux pas vous donner la marque ni le type du sectionneur, mais je pense qu'il s'agit d'un modèle courant, genre "coupe batterie de camion".

Le porte fusible est de conception personnelle.

Vous trouverez une photo du fusible et du sectionneur dans le log "My PV system making of" à la ligne "August 25th, 2013: Battery Box and 200 Amps fuse".

A+ - Michel

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dzinworldcup wrote 03/26/2015 at 09:04 point

ok, merci beaucoup.

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dzinworldcup wrote 02/15/2015 at 11:11 point

Bonjour

svp, pour la mise a la terre de votre instalation ,est ce que la terre  du system solaire est independante du la   terre du l'instalation domestique ?et quelle rigime de mise a la terre est utilisé

plus de details sur le branchement sera appricié

Merci 

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 02/18/2015 at 06:01 point

Bonjour,

J'ai utilisé des TerraGrif (Mobasolar) pour relier les panneaux aux rails et les rails sont reliés à la terre de la maison au niveau du tableau électrique par un câble de 16 mm².

J'espère avoir répondu à votre question.


Michel

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dzinworldcup wrote 02/18/2015 at 10:31 point

Bonjour

merci d'avoir répondu a mon message

je voulais savoir le type de regime de neutre TT, TN ou IT puisque le regime de terre du reseau de distibution est de type TT

maintenan si notre systeme et déconnecté du réseau  par le selecteur de source , quel est le type de regime de neutre pour notre installation autonome

pouvez vous m'envoyer le schema electrique  de liason SVP

Merci et pardon pour toutes ces questions

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 02/18/2015 at 10:34 point

Bonjour,

La coupure est unipolaire, seule la phase est commutée. Le neutre et la terre sont constamment branchés.

Michel

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dzinworldcup wrote 02/18/2015 at 10:50 point

ok

maintenant vous dite que la terre des modules est reliée a la terre de la maison dans le tableau electrique ,est ce de méme que la terre du régulateur et de l'onduleur?est ce que tout les cables de terre sont reliés a la méme terre de la  maison ?on d'autre terme dans toute l'instalation que ce soit solaire ou reseau ,il y'a un seul point de terre commun entre eaux?

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 02/18/2015 at 12:19 point

C'est exactement cela. Il  n'y a qu'un seul conducteur de terre qui relie tous les appareils. La norme prévoit aussi un parafoudre sur la sortie DC du champ solaire et un parafoudre en sortie AC d'onduleur. Ces parafoudres sont aussi reliés à la terre de la maison.

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dzinworldcup wrote 02/18/2015 at 18:58 point

merci 
encore une derniere question
si on relie l'onduleur a la terre(la carcasse metalique), et qu'on sort avec la phase et le neutre ,doit'on relier le neutre de l'onduleur a la terre ou est ce que le fait de relier l'onduleur (carcasse) a la terre veut dire qu'on est entrain de relier aussi le neutre a la terre,(?c'est a dire que le neutre de l'onduleur est deja relié a la terre a sa sortie?

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 02/19/2015 at 03:07 point

La sortie de l'onduleur est isolée par un transfo. Les deux fils de ce transfo sont sortis sur des bornes. Je ne pense pas qu'un côté soit mis à la terre. je vérifierai ce soir et vous donnerai la réponse.

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dzinworldcup wrote 02/19/2015 at 06:21 point

ok merci beaucoup ,j'attends votre réponse.

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 02/19/2015 at 20:02 point

Bonsoir,

J'ai vérifié l'onduleur. Il y a un fil jaune/vert qui relie la masse mécanique à la borne neutre. Il est muni de cosses, on peut donc le déconnecter. Je l'ai laissé en place.

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dzinworldcup wrote 02/19/2015 at 20:59 point

ok merci beaucoup.

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dzinworldcup wrote 02/15/2015 at 11:11 point

Bonjour

svp, pour la mise a la terre de votre instalation ,est ce que la terre  du system solaire est independante du la   terre du l'instalation domestique ?et quelle rigime de mise a la terre est utilisé

plus de details sur le branchement sera appricié

Merci 

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Michael Haas wrote 10/25/2014 at 06:46 point
This is a great project, and the implementation is even better. Thanks for sharing.

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 10/25/2014 at 07:35 point
Hallo Michael,

Danke sehr für den Skull.

Mein Ziel ist momentan die Automatische Umschaltung zwischen Netz und Solar zu optimieren. Das heist, verschidene parametern benutzen, Zb. Wettervorhersagen und auch wie lange der tag dauern will.

Ich denke Fuzzy Logic Steurung dazu benutzen. Kenst du dich in diesem Bereich aus ?

Mit Freundlichen Grüssen aus dem Elsass.
Michel

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Michael Haas wrote 10/26/2014 at 11:16 point
Hallo Michel,

als gebürtiger Saarländer kann ich auch ein wenig französisch, aber für eine Unterhaltung reicht es nicht ganz :)

Zum Thema Fuzzy Logic: da kenne ich mich gar nicht aus. Was mir zum Thema einfiele, wäre evtl was aus dem Machine-Learning-Bereich. Du schaltest manuell um, sammelst die Parameter zum jeweiligen Umschaltzeitpunkt als Features (Tagesdauer, Wetter, Wolkenwahrscheinlichkeit) und trainierst einen Classifier darauf.
Oder du schreibst Regeln von Hand, falls du da schon eine Idee hast. "Wenn Sonnendauer < 4, schalte um". Denkst du, du kannst mit der Optimierung viel Strom sparen?

Die Idee ist aber eher motiviert aus den Werkzeugen, die ich kenne. If you've got a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 10/26/2014 at 16:29 point
Hallo Michael,

Danke sehr für die gute und originelle Ideen.

Das Ziel is nicht nur Strom zu sparen, sondern auch die Batterie schönen damit si so lang wie möglich dauert. Wen man wenig die Batterie entlehrt kan sie sehr lange dauern (10 jahre oder mehr) , aber die Unabhängigkeit vom Netz is demnach nicht sehr gut. Wen man mehr die batterie benuzt, geht sie schneller kaput, aber man kauft weiniger Strom vom Netz ab.

So meine Idee is so einen Kompromiss zu finden zwischen "Batterie schönung" und "Unabhängigkeit". Nicht so einfach...

Ich habe festgestellt dans Ich wärend den Sommer "agressiv" mit der Batterie sein kan. Die Tage sind sehr lang, so trotz nicht immer schönen Wetter, ist die Batterie bei ende des Tages generell voll geladen. Im durchnit steht die maximale entladung Tiefe (Depth of Discharge) um 15 % (Eine sehr gute Zahl).

Im winter muss ich mehr sorgfältig umgehen. die Tage sie sehr kurz und das Wetter oft bewölkt. So steht die batterie oft bis zu 30 % entladung tiefe bei Tages ende (Eine sehr weniger guhte Zahl). In diesem fall kan es klug sein zimmlich schnell zum Netz rückschalten damit die Energie der Sonne nur für die Batterie beladung benutzt wird.

So, ich hofe das alles klar ist !

Ich denke Fuzzy Logic mit "Handgeschtrikte Regeln" die beste Idee ist. Den Hammer habe ich gefunden :-)

Grüsse,
Michel

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Michael Haas wrote 10/26/2014 at 17:25 point
Hallo,

ehrlich von Hand gestrickt währt am längsten :)

Von wie vielen Variablen ist deine Source Selection denn abhängig? Reicht es nicht, die Umschaltung über den DoD zu triggern? Oder je nach Jahreszeit zwei unterschiedliche Schellwerte?

Grüße,

Michael

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 10/26/2014 at 17:43 point
Ja genau, eine einfache Methode könte so lauten:

Sommersonnenwende:
Netz -> PV: 20 % DoD
PV -> Netz : 40 % DoD

Wintersonnenwende:
Netz -> PV: 0 % DoD
PV -> Netz : 20 % DoD

Zwischen Sommersonnenwende und Wintersonnenwende, werden die Schwellwerten auf der Basis der Tagesdauer interpoliert. Die Tagesdauer kann ich ja einfach mit einem Python script ausrechnen. Die Schwellwerten werden dann zum BMS (Batterie Management System) über den CAN Bus gesendet.

Michel

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electrothug wrote 09/01/2014 at 13:21 point
Great project Michel!
keep up the good work

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 09/01/2014 at 13:25 point
Thanks a lot !
Best regards,
Michel

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Frederic wrote 09/01/2014 at 05:56 point
Hello Michel,

I was thinking french laws disallow to do this kind of setup. I'm very interested in doing same kind of thing (actually I done this for my pool lighting), but so far, I don't want to risk money plus trouble doing it.

To my knowledge, All electricity produced in France has to be sold to ERDF and go to the grid.

Have you checked this?

Thanks for all the information.

Cheers,

Fred

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 09/01/2014 at 07:18 point
Hi Frederic,

What you are explaining is unfortunately a very common belief in France. Every body can produce and consume the electricity they produce. One thing you cannot do is to sell this juice to your neighbor.

So , go ahead, get Off-grid.

Regards,
Michel

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Sancho_sk wrote 08/31/2014 at 08:01 point
Great project, lots of valuable information, that are very hard to obtain elsewhere. Thanks a lot for sharing this! Did you, by any chance, considered extension of the system using wind ower generator? I thing that for quite small additional investment you can provide the remaining 13% of the power.
Also, a huge water tank (2000 l +) can store a lot of sanitary hot water - there is some guy from Czech republic with such setup, he is also heating the water using solar water heater in combination with electricity and he is fully off-grid.
Again, congratulations on the project - I would not have the guts to risk 14k € without sufficient information on the ROI upfront.

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 08/31/2014 at 08:32 point
Hello Sancho,

Thank you very much for following this project.

Regarding adding wind a generator: I have considered it, by in my place, the wind is not sufficient by far, unfortunately. I will add a log to explain this.

Have you got a link to this Czech guy's website ?

Regards,
Michel

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pauline.kbs wrote 08/24/2014 at 17:38 point
Salut Michel, superbe installation!! Bises à vous quatre, JLK et Cie

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 08/25/2014 at 13:47 point
Merci +++ pour tout.
Bises
Michel

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dinodino68 wrote 08/17/2014 at 17:04 point
salut mon quinca tu m'as fait une visite guidée qui m 'a vraiment impressionnée good luck
à très bientôt; claudio

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 08/17/2014 at 20:36 point
Salut Mon Pote !
Merci pour le Skull, c'est trop sympa !

A+ - Kuk

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saschott wrote 08/14/2014 at 08:28 point
Génial Michel ! Reste le soleil de ta petite famille !
Sandrine

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Gilles KREBS wrote 08/13/2014 at 09:26 point
Great job Michel!

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Michel Kuenemann wrote 08/13/2014 at 09:40 point
Thanks a lot. Your Lighting System looks great at night on the roof - Doesn't it !

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Gilles KREBS wrote 08/13/2014 at 12:49 point
Yes, it gives beautiful colors converted directly from natural photon juice. Mhhhh!

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